Troop 505 Camporee 2015

b922dd8eb8f176f0daf19a981113ae93On 5/1/2015-5/3/2015, Troop 505 was at Camp Campbell at the 2015 camporee.  We were voted troop of 29 troops there. If you are wondering, the raft “floated”. It floated just fine on its own, but when we put a box and 2 people on it, it sunk from a foot to and inch underwater and didn’t touch the bottom. Me, (Jeff) was one of 5 people in the whole camp to cut a perfect 1 inch thick circle of wood off a log with a bow saw. It was the first time  have seen us cook well. The adults commented on how good it was.

Troop 505 Official Grubmaster Record

A good Troop Duty Roster assigns equal work for everyone in the Troop. Done properly it will help maintain order, everyone will know their assigned duties and no Scout will have to worry that they are doing more than their share. Everyone will be assured the opportunity to be an active member of their Patrol.

Two weeks prior to departure, each Patrol is responsible for assigning a Grubmaster.

A Grubmaster… may have to breakaway from an activity early in order to start the meal. Prepare and serve the meal ON TIME; put away extra food and put trash from the food preparation in the trash; put wash and rinse water on to heat up during the meal; dump hot grease before they eat; assure everyone receives an equal portion (either serve the food to patrol members and guests or tell everyone the amount they can have). The cooks serve themselves last. Try to have everything ready at the same time. Remember: CLEAN AS YOU GO.

To help aide the Grubmaster in planning and assigning responsibilities for meal planning and preparation the assigned Scout must complete the TROOP 505 GRUBMASTER RECORD. The ASPL must approve the final Grubmaster Record 72 hours prior to departure.

Remember more hands will make the work easier. The patrol members are not dismissed to attend other activities until the kitchen and patrol areas are secured.

You are not ready, if your patrol is not ready. The Troop is not ready, unless all Patrols are ready. When the Troop is ready, then you are ready.

GRUBMASTER RECORD PDF

Troop 505 Official Quartermaster Register

A good Troop Duty Roster assigns equal work for everyone in the Troop. Done properly it will help maintain order, everyone will know their assigned duties and no Scout will have to worry that they are doing more than their share. Everyone will be assured the opportunity to be an active member of their Patrol.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster must be completed by the assigned Patrol 1 week prior to departure and approved by the SPL at least 72 hours prior to departure.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster is completed in two parts. The Duty Roster for the trip programming is completed by the Program Patrol assigned by the SPL. The Duty Roster for the trip service items are completed by the Service Patrol assigned by the SPL.

Upon completion of the Program and Service Patrol Duty Roster(s) the Quartermaster must confirm the Quartermaster responsibilities of the Duty Roster(s) are properly assigned and equipment is properly allocated by Patrol with the completion the TROOP 505 QUARTERMASTER REGISTER.

The SPL must approve the final Quartermaster Register 72 hours prior to departure.

QUARTERMASTER REGISTER PDF

Troop 505 Official Service Patrol Duty Roster

A good Troop Duty Roster assigns equal work for everyone in the Troop. Done properly it will help maintain order, everyone will know their assigned duties and no Scout will have to worry that they are doing more than their share. Everyone will be assured the opportunity to be an active member of their Patrol.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster must be completed by the assigned Patrol 1 week prior to departure and approved by the SPL at least 72 hours prior to departure.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster is completed in two parts. The Duty Roster for the trip service items are completed by the Service Patrol assigned by the SPL: TROOP 505 SERVICE PATROL DUTY ROSTER. The Duty Roster for the trip programming is completed by the Program Patrol assigned by the SPL.

Service Patrol Duty Roster Responsibilities

Color Guard: Present and retire US and Troop Flags at dawn and prior to dusk. Scouts should start out of Troop sight, ready holding the flags. The US Flag is on the right, then State flag, then Troop flag on the far left. Color Guard Leader should follow the following script.

“Color Guard, Attention!”

“Audience, Please Rise!”

“Scout Salute! Those not in uniform, please place your right hand over your heart.”

“Color Guard, Forward March!”

(wait for color guard to reach the front)

“Color Guard, Halt!”

“Color Guard, Cross the Colors!”

(US Flag crosses in front of others to left-most flag stand, then state, then troop flags. wait for flag bearers to move to the flag pole stands)

“Color Guard, Post the Flag of Troop 505! ”

“Color Guard, Post the Flag of the Great State of North Carolina! ”

(US Flag remains held by bearer)

“Please recite the Pledge of Allegiance!”

“TWO!”

(Everyone drops salute)

“Scout Sign!”

(Everyone raises right hand making the Scout sign or Cub Scout sign)

“Please join us in reciting the [Scout Law, Scout Oath]!”

(this is where the ceremony can be customized by the color guard. Choose what to recite. Could sing a song such as ‘America the Beautiful’..)

“TWO!”

(Everyone drops Scout sign)

“Color Guard, Post the Flag of the United States of America! ”

“Color Guard, Honor your Colors!”

(Flag bearers salute the US flag)

“Color Guard, return to ranks!”

(wait for flag bearers return to formation)

“Troop at Ease, Please be seated!”

Waterman: Get sufficient water for next meal including drinking, cooking and cleanup water. Should be available during the meal in case cooks need more water. If necessary water should be filtered or treated in time to be used for the meal.

First Aid Responder: Should be extremely knowledgable in first aid; Check Troop First Aid Kit supplies; know location of First Aid kit at all times; Present First Aid kit to Troop and specify location of kit at beginning of each day to Troop; be prepared to respond in any emergency situation.

Sanitation: Wash the dishes; wipe down the stove, tables, and food preparation area; put away the clean dishes; dump dirty dish water (if needed) in sump; hang dish cloths so they can dry and secure the dinning area. No dirty dishes are to be left and all food is to be put away. Check condition of dining fly and kitchen sump. Get Down and/or Hang Bear Bags.

Bugler: The Bugler plays the bugle at troop ceremonies. Must be able to perform the required Bugle Calls

Fire Marshal: If the meal is to be cooked over an open fire, the scout may have to breakaway from an activity early in order to establish a good fire for the cooks. If stoves are being used, set up and fuel stoves. Check condition of ax yard, fire pit, lantern mantels, and latrine (Patrol and Troop).

Leave No Trace: Pick up trash in camp; straighten up personal gear; check condition of tent. Make sure the area is secured for expected weather conditions. Make sure Troop is strictly following the Leave No Trace Principals.

SERVICE PATROL DUTY ROSTER PDF

Troop 505 Official Program Patrol Duty Roster

A good Troop Duty Roster assigns equal work for everyone in the Troop. Done properly it will help maintain order, everyone will know their assigned duties and no Scout will have to worry that they are doing more than their share. Everyone will be assured the opportunity to be an active member of their Patrol.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster must be completed by the assigned Patrol 1 week prior to departure and approved by the SPL at least 72 hours prior to departure.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster is completed in two parts. The Duty Roster for the trip programming is completed by the Program Patrol assigned by the SPL: TROOP 505 PROGRAM PATROL DUTY ROSTER. The Duty Roster for the trip service items are completed by the Service Patrol assigned by the SPL.

Program Patrol Duty Roster Responsibilities

Trek Leaders: Should be familiar with Trek, Check weather conditions and report to SPL, Lead the Troop – one in front one in the rear thru throughout Trek.

Chaplain Aide: Lead Patrol in Grace. Lead Scouts Own on Sunday morning.

Master Of Ceremonies: MC for the campfire ceremony, host of a staged events, skits, music, cheers or similar performance, present performers, speaks to the audience, and generally keeps the campfire ceremony moving.

Musician: Play a musical instrument (or lead vocally in song) the campfire ceremony music, cheers or song.

Campfire Planing Responsibilities

A memorable Campfire requires planning. You can begin your planning process by reading Michael Lee Zwiers excellent article, Campfire Magic. Then, learn how to use the Campfire Worksheet portion of the Program Patrol Planner, download it, and put these ideas to work.

Campfire Magic

by Michael Lee Zwiers, from The Leader, June/July 1989

Campfire Magic!

You’ve experienced it. You chose the songs, practiced skits, and organized everything into a program. Then you brought people together and began.

Everything went without a hitch. Participants sang the songs enthusiastically and laughed uproariously (or groaned painfully) at the skits. From there, the tone and pace of the program slowed until the final prayer was just a memory on the lips and in the ears.

As the dying campfire crumbled into ashes, campers reluctantly drifted off to bed. You stood before the glowing embers, soaking in their fading warmth and knowing that everything was just right. You’ve been touched by campfire magic.

Campfires like this are special but rare. They need not be. With a little careful thought and preparation, they can become the rule and not the exception. What follows are some hints and ideas from Alberta’s campfire leader training courses to help you plan a campfire program, deliver it smoothly, and bring the magic to it.

Planning

The structure of a magic campfire is like the shape of the fire. It builds up slowly from the lighting and opening to a peak, then subsides gradually to the closing as the fire burns down to embers.

The opening includes parading to the formal circle, introductions, the fire lighting, and a short, upbeat opening verse that sets the mood and guidelines for the fire and welcomes people to the magic of the experience. You may deliver it dramatically with arms in the air or holding a hand over the fire. You may involve participants by having them echo a line or, if you are using a “magic start”, asking them to concentrate to inspire the fire to light. Perhaps you’ll have a number of torch bearers light the fire as you declare it open. Build up from the opening with some well known songs, a few rounds, some fun songs, some action songs, a game and stunt or two and, at the peak of excitement, skits and yells. Bring down things slowly with a few rousing songs, some quieter songs, a story or Scouter’s Five, a spiritual song or two, vespers and taps, and a closing verse.

You might include a short Scout silence before the verse or invite participants to pause for a moment to listen to night sounds or reflect and be thankful. Many campfire leaders end the verse with “I now declare this campfire closed” but, as Lewis Carroll once said, “They don’t seem to have any rules in particular; at least, if there are, nobody attends to them.”

Hints For Success

Before the event, review campfire etiquette with your gang. The campfire circle is sacred and always quiet before and after the fire. Prohibit flashlights from the circle. Make a no-talking rule. If wood needs to be added to the fire during the campfire, only the Keeper of the Flame may do it. Applause takes the form of yells, not clapping.

Choose a magic site (on the lake shore, etc.) and, however you start it, keep the fire a reasonable size. Fires that are too big can take away the magic. To enhance the mystique, you may want to add ashes from your last campfire to this new one. And, if you clean up all the coals and other signs of festivity before the next morning, your campers will always think of the campfire site as a special place.

Keep the program short. If you will offer refreshments later, plan time so that it won’t break up a good program. For the greatest success, involve as many people as possible in the campfire as leaders of songs or yells or players in skits or stunts. If you can, audition songs and skits ahead of time to avoid any possible problems, either with difficulty or poor taste. Choose songs you enjoy and know your young members enjoy. Stick to the familiar rather than trying to teach a new song, unless it is something really easy, repetitive, and fun. Be sure you include parents and special guests as well as campers. Avoid song sheets or books, a sure way to destroy atmosphere as participants turn their backs to the fire in hopes of catching some light to read the words.

Look for audience feedback. Are they singing and taking part or looking bored? Keep it alive. If a song is too slow, speed it up. If it is really dragging, simply end it and move into a “no fail” song you have up your sleeve. Set a brisk pace with minimum breaks between songs. Sometimes campers become so caught up in the fun they want to sing every song they’ve ever heard. You have to be firm, but remind them they can have their own sing song and put in all their favorites at their tent site after the formal campfire is over.

If someone brings along a musical instrument, ensure that it enhances the experience. If it begins to detract by becoming a “solo” act because nobody knows the songs or they are all slow ballads, stop the player firmly but politely.

Announce the next act or song at least one act ahead so that the people involved have time to prepare. If you know who is on next, you can simply whisper in an ear to alert them. Keep a set of quickie yells, stunts, or songs on hand in case a person or group is not ready to perform when the time comes or you need to stop a performance for some reason.

For example if, despite your screening, a group begins a skit or stunt in poor taste, stop it. Indicate simply that it is not appropriate and go on with something else. After the campfire, talk with those involved to explain the reason for your actions.

Once you’ve eliminated the problem of poor taste, skits or stunts can still go wrong if the players speak too quietly or position themselves badly (e.g. with backs to the audience). That’s another good reason for pre-campfire auditions. To work well and safely, a skit needs good light. The Keeper of the Flame can add small sticks to a dim fire. You might also provide pot lights or kerosene lanterns, as long as they aren’t so bright they detract from the atmosphere.

Keep a firm rein on proceedings to avoid things like poorly timed announcements that can destroy the magic. If some participants begin to cause a distraction, you can do one of two things. Signal another Scout to tap them on the shoulder and talk quietly to them. If you stop a campfire to lecture noisemakers, it’s an automatic downer.

A campfire may be magic, but there’s no trick to it, just good planning and some common sense. At the many campfires in your future, may you often be touched by the magic.

PROGRAM PATROL DUTY ROSTER PDF

Troop 505 Official Senior Patrol Leader Expedition Itinerary

Every successful Troop 505 Expedition starts with great leadership and planning. Our Troop Expedition Agenda is designed and booked every year in October. And by the 1st of December our PLC will vote in a final Troop Expedition Agenda and post it on the homepage of our Troop website.

The SPL is responsible, with the help of the PLC, for detailing each day of the Troop Expedition at least 3 weeks prior to the departure using the TROOP 505 SENIOR PATROL LEADER ITINERARY. This schedule must be presented to the Scoutmaster for final approval and presented to the Patrol Leaders at SPL 3 weeks prior to departure to allow time for proper Troop Duty Roster development.

Troop 505 Official Expedition Duty Rosters

Every successful Troop 505 Expedition starts with great leadership and planning. Our Troop Expedition Agenda is designed and booked every year in October. And by the 1st of December our PLC will vote in a final Troop Expedition Agenda and post it on the homepage of our Troop website.

The SPL is responsible, with the help of the PLC, for detailing each day of the Troop Expedition at least 3 weeks prior to the departure using the TROOP 505 SENIOR PATROL LEADER ITINERARY. This schedule must be presented to the Scoutmaster for final approval and presented to the Patrol Leaders at SPL 3 weeks prior to departure to allow time for proper Troop Duty Roster development.

A good Troop Duty Roster assigns equal work for everyone in the Troop. Done properly it will help maintain order, everyone will know their assigned duties and no Scout will have to worry that they are doing more than their share. Everyone will be assured the opportunity to be an active member of their Patrol.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster must be completed by the assigned Patrol 1 week prior to departure and approved by the SPL at least 72 hours prior to departure.

The Troop 505 Duty Roster is completed in two parts. The Duty Roster for the trip programming is completed by the Program Patrol assigned by the SPL: TROOP 505 PROGRAM PATROL DUTY ROSTER. The Duty Roster for the trip service items are completed by the Service Patrol assigned by the SPL: TROOP 505 SERVICE PATROL DUTY ROSTER.

Upon completion of the Program and Service Patrol Duty Roster(s) the Quartermaster must confirm the Quartermaster responsibilities of the Duty Roster(s) are properly assigned and equipment is properly allocated by Patrol with the completion the TROOP 505 QUARTERMASTER REGISTER. The SPL must approve the final Quartermaster Plan 72 hours prior to departure.

Each Patrol is responsible for assigning a Patrol Grubmaster. To help aide the Grubmaster in planning and assigning responsibilities for meal planning and preparation the assigned Scout must complete the TROOP 505 GRUBMASTER RECORD. The ASPL must approve the final Quartermaster Plan 72 hours prior to departure.

You are not ready, if your patrol is not ready. The Troop is not ready, unless all Patrols are ready. When the Troop is ready, then you are ready.

SENIOR PATROL LEADER ITINERARY PDF

PROGRAM PATROL DUTY ROSTER PDF

SERVICE PATROL DUTY ROSTER PDF

QUARTERMASTER REGISTER PDF

GRUBMASTER RECORD PDF