Camping Merit Badge Requirements

1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while camping, including hypothermia, frostbite, heat reactions, dehydration, altitude sickness, insect stings, tick bites, snakebite, blisters, and hyperventilation.

2. Learn the Leave No Trace principles and the Outdoor Code and explain what they mean. Write a personal and group plan for implementing these principles on your next outing.

3. Make a written plan for an overnight trek and show how to get to your camping spot using a topographical map and compass OR a topographical map and a GPS receiver.

4. Do the following: a. Make a duty roster showing how your patrol is organized for an actual overnight campout. List assignments for each member., b. Help a Scout patrol or a Webelos Scout unit in your area prepare for an actual campout, including creating the duty roster, menu planning, equipment needs, general planning, and setting up camp.

5. Do the following: a. Prepare a list of clothing you would need for overnight campouts in both warm and cold weather. Explain the term “layering.”, b. Discuss footwear for different kinds of weather and how the right footwear is important for protecting your feet., c. Explain the proper care and storage of camping equipment (clothing, footwear, bedding)., d. List the outdoor essentials necessary for any campout, and explain why each item is needed., e. Present yourself to your Scoutmaster with your pack for inspection. Be correctly clothed and equipped for an overnight campout.

6. Do the following: a. Describe the features of four types of tents, when and where they could be used, and how to care for tents. Working with another Scout, pitch a tent., b. Discuss the importance of camp sanitation and tell why water treatment is essential. Then demonstrate two ways to treat water., c. Describe the factors to be considered in deciding where to pitch your tent., d. Tell the difference between internal- and external-frame packs. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each., e. Discuss the types of sleeping bags and what kind would be suitable for different conditions. Explain the proper care of your sleeping bag and how to keep it dry. Make a comfortable ground bed.

7. Prepare for an overnight campout with your patrol by doing the following:Make a checklist of personal and patrol gear that will be needed. a. Pack your own gear and your share of the patrol equipment and food for proper carrying. b. Show that your pack is right for quickly getting what is needed first, and that it has been assembled properly for comfort, weight, balance, size, and neatness.

8. Do the following: a. Explain the safety procedures for 1. Using a propane or butane/propane stove, 2. Using a liquid fuel stove, 3. Proper storage of extra fuel, b. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lightweight cooking stoves., c. Prepare a camp menu. Explain how the menu would differ from a menu for a backpacking or float trip. Give recipes and make a food list for your patrol. Plan two breakfasts, three lunches, and two suppers. Discuss how to protect your food against bad weather, animals, and contamination., d. Cook at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner for your patrol from the meals you have planned for requirement 8c. At least one of those meals must be a trail meal requiring the use of a lightweight stove.

9. Show experience in camping by doing the following: a. Camp a total of at least 20 days and 20 nights. The 20 days and 20 nights must be at a designated Scouting activity or event. Sleep each night under the sky or in a tent you have pitched. You may use a week of long-term camp toward this requirement. If the camp provides a tent that has already been pitched, you need not pitch your own tent., b. On any of these camping experiences, you must do TWO of the following, only with proper preparation and under qualified supervision. 1. Hike up a mountain, gaining at least 1,000 vertical feet., 2. Backpack, snowshoe, or cross-country ski for at least 4 miles., 3. Take a bike trip of at least 15 miles or at least four hours., 4. Take a nonmotorized trip on the water of at least four hours or 5 miles., 5. Plan and carry out an overnight snow camping experience., 6. Rappel down a rappel route of 30 feet or more., 7. Perform a conservation project approved by the landowner or land managing agency.

10. Discuss how the things you did to earn this badge have taught you about personal health and safety, survival, public health, conservation, and good citizenship. In your discussion, tell how Scout spirit and the Scout Oath and Law apply to camping and outdoor ethics.

Sports Merit Badge Requirements

sports_lgMillions of people participate in sports every year. For some the appeal is the close friendships that come with being part of a team. Some revel in the joy of victory and lessons of defeat. For some, the personal fitness is so important that exercise becomes a daily need. And still others desire the feeling of achievement, that feeling of measurable improvement that comes with dedication to a sport.

  1. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while playing sports, including sprains, strains, contusions, abrasions, fractures, blisters, muscle cramps, dehydration, heat and cold reactions, injured teeth, nausea, and suspected injuries to the head, neck, and back.
  2. Explain the importance of the following:
    1. The importance of the physical exam
    2. The importance of maintaining good health habits for life (such as exercising regularly), and how the use of tobacco products, alcohol, and other harmful substances can negatively affect your health and your performance in sports activities
    3. The importance of maintaining a healthy diet
  3. Discuss the following:
    1. The importance of warming up and cooling down
    2. The importance of weight training
    3. What an amateur athlete is and the differences between an amateur and a professional athlete
    4. The attributes (qualities) of a good sport, the importance of sportsmanship, and the traits of a good team leader and player who exhibits Scout spirit on and off the playing field
  4. Take part for one season (or four months) as a competitive individual or as a member of an organized team in TWO of the following sports: baseball, basketball, bowling, cross-country, field hockey, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, softball, table tennis, tennis, volleyball, water polo. Your counselor may approve in advance other recognized sports, but not any sport that is restricted and not authorized by the Boy Scouts of America. Then with your chosen sports do the following:
    1. Give the rules and etiquette for the two sports you picked.
    2. List the equipment needed for the two sports you chose. Describe the protective equipment and appropriate clothing (if any) and explain why it is needed.
    3. Draw diagrams of the playing areas for your two sports.
  5. With guidance from your counselor, establish a personal training program suited to the activities you chose for requirement 4. Then do the following:
    1. Organize a chart to track your training, practice, and development in these sports for one season (or four months).
    2. Demonstrate proper technique for your two chosen sports.
    3. At the end of the season, share your completed chart with your counselor and discuss how your participation in the sports you chose has affected you mentally and physically.

Fishing Merit Badge Requirements

1. Do the following: a. Discuss the prevention of and treatment for the following health concerns that could occur while fishing, including cuts, scratches, puncture wounds, insect bites, hypothermia, dehydration, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and sunburn. b. Explain how to remove a hook that has lodged in your arm. c. Name and explain five safety practices you should always follow while fishing.

2. Discuss the differences between two types of fishing outfits. Point out and identify the parts of several types of rods and reels. Explain how and when each would be used. Review with your counselor how to care for this equipment.

3. Demonstrate the proper use of two different types of fishing equipment.

4. Demonstrate how to tie the following knots: clinch, Palomar, turle, blood loop (barrel knot), and double surgeon’s loop. Explain how and when each knot is used.

5. Name and identify five basic artificial lures and five natural baits and explain how to fish with them. Explain why bait fish are not to be released.

6. Do the following: a. Explain the importance of practicing Leave No Trace techniques. Discuss the positive effects of Leave No Trace on fishing resources. b. Discuss the meaning and importance of catch and release. Describe how to properly release a fish safely to the water.

7. Obtain and review a copy of the regulations affecting game fishing where you live. Explain why they were adopted and what you accomplish by following them.

8. Explain what good outdoor sportsmanlike behavior is and how it relates to anglers. Tell how the Outdoor Code of the Boy Scouts of America relates to a fishing sports enthusiast, including the aspects of littering, trespassing, courteous behavior, and obeying fishing regulations.

9. Catch at least one fish. If regulations and health concerns permit, clean and cook a fish you have caught. Otherwise, acquire a fish and cook it.

Communication Merit Badge Requirements

1. Do ONE of the following: 1. For one day, keep a log in which you describe your communication activities. Keep track of the time and different ways you spend communicating, such as talking person-to-person, listening to your teachers or the radio, watching television, reading books, and other print media, and communicating online. Discuss with your counselor what your log reveals about the importance of communication in your life.  Think of ways to improve your communications skills. 2. For three days, keep a journal of your listening experiences. Identify one example of each of the following, and discuss with your counselor when you have listened to: a. Obtain information. b. A persuasive argument. c. Appreciate or enjoy something. d. Understand someone’s feelings. 3. In a small-group setting, meet with other scouts or with friends. Have them share personal stories about significant events in their lives that affected them in some way. Take note of how each scout participates in the group discussion and how effective each one is in telling his story. Report what you have learned to your counselor about the differences you observed in effective communication. 4. List as many ways as you can think of to communicate with others (face-to-face, by telephone, letter, e-mail, fax). For each type of communication discuss with your counselor an instance when that method might not be appropriate or effective.

2. Do ONE of the following: a. Think of a creative way to describe yourself, using, for example, a collage, short story or autobiography, drawing or series of photographs, or a song or skit. Using the aid you created, make a presentation to your counselor about yourself. b. Choose a concept, product, or service in which you have great confidence. Build a sales plan based on its good points. Try to persuade the counselor to agree with, use, or buy your concept, product or service.  After your sales talk, discuss with your counselor how persuasive you were.

3. Write a five-minute speech. Give it at a meeting of a group.

4. Interview someone you know fairly well, like, or respect because of his or her position, talent, career or life experiences. Listen actively to learn as much as you can about the person. Then prepare and deliver to your counselor an introduction of the person as though this person were to be a guest speaker, and include reasons why the audience would want to hear this person speak.  Show how you would call to invite this person to speak.

5. Attend a public meeting (city council, school board, debate) approved by your counselor where several points of view are given on a single issue. Practice active listening skills and take careful notes of each point of view. Present an objective report that includes all points of view that were expressed, and share this with your counselor.

6. With your counselor’s approval, develop a plan to teach a skill or inform someone about something. Prepare teaching aids for your plan. Carry out your plan. With your counselor, determine whether the person has learned what you intended.

7. Do ONE of the following: a. Write to the editor of a magazine or your local newspaper to express your opinion or share information on any subject you choose. Send your message by fax, email or regular mail. b. Create a web page for your scout troop, school, or other organization. Include at least one article and one photograph or illustration, and one link to some other web page that would be helpful to someone who visits the web page you have created. It is not necessary to post your web page to the internet, but if you decide to do so, you must first share it with your parents and counselor and get their permission. c. Use desktop publishing to produce a newsletter, brochure, flier or other printed material for your scout troop, class at school, or other group. Include at least one article and one photograph or illustration.

8. Plan a troop court of honor or campfire program. Have the patrol leaders’ council approve it, then write the script and prepare the program. Serve as master of ceremonies.

9. Learn about opportunities in the field of communication. Choose one career in which you are interested and discuss with your counselor the major responsibilities of that position and the qualifications, education, and preparation it requires.

Family Life Merit Badge Requirements

1. Prepare an outline on what a family is and discuss this with your merit badge counselor. Tell why families are important to individuals and to society. Discuss how the actions of one member can affect other members.

2. List several reasons why you are important to your family and discuss this with your parents or guardians and with your merit badge counselor.

3. Prepare a list of your regular home duties or chores (at least five) and do them for 90 days. Keep a record of how often you do each of them.

4. With the approval of your parents or guardians and your merit badge counselor, decide on and carry out a project that you would do around the home that would benefit your family. Submit a report to your merit badge counselor outlining how the project benefited your family.

5. Plan and carry out a project that involves the participation of your family. After completing the project, discuss the following with your merit badge counselor: a. The objective or goal of the project, b. How individual members of your family participated, c. The results of the project

6. Do the following:

a. Discuss with your merit badge counselor how to plan and carry out a family meeting.

b. After this discussion, plan and carry out a family meeting to include the following subjects: 1. Avoiding substance abuse, 2. Understanding the growing-up process and how the body changes, and making responsible decisions dealing with sex, 3. Personal and family finances, 4. A crisis situation within your family, 5. The effect of technology on your family

Discussion of each of these subjects will very likely carry over to more than one family meeting.

7. Discuss the following with your counselor: a. Your understanding of what makes an effective father and why, and your thoughts on the father’s role in the family, b. Your understanding of the responsibilities of a parent.

Shotgun Merit Badge Requirements

1. Do the following:

a. Explain why BB and pellet air guns must always be treated with the same respect as firearms.

b. Describe how you would react if a friend visiting your home asked to see your or your family’s firearm(s).

c. Explain the need for and use and types of eye and hearing protection.

d. Explain the main points of the laws for owning and using guns in your community and state.

e. Explain how hunting is related to the wise use of renewable wildlife resources.

f. Successfully complete a state hunter education course, or obtain a copy of the hunting laws for your state, then do the following. 1. Explain the main points of hunting laws in your state and give any special laws on the use of guns and ammunition, and 2. List the kinds of wildlife that can be legally hunted in your state.

g. Explain to your counselor the proper hygienic guidelines used in shooting.

h. Identify and explain three shotgun sports. Identify places in your community where you could shoot these sports and explain how you can join or be a part of shooting sports activities.

i. Give your counselor a list of sources that you could contact for information on firearms and their use.

j. Do ONE of the following options:

Shotgun Shooting (Modern Shotshell Type) Option

a. Identify the principal parts of a shotgun, action types, and how they function.

b. Identify and demonstrate the rules for safely handling a shotgun.

c. Identify the parts of a shotgun shell and their functions.

d. Identify the various gauges of shotguns. Explain which one you would pick for use and why.

e. Identify and explain the fundamentals of safely shooting a shotgun.

f. Identify and explain each rule for safely shooting a shotgun.

g. Demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitude necessary to safely shoot moving targets, using the fundamentals of shotgun shooting.

h. Identify the materials needed to clean a shotgun.

i. Demonstrate how to clean a shotgun safely.

j. Discuss what points you would consider in selecting a shotgun.

k. Shooting score required—Hit at least 12 (48 percent) out of 25 targets in two 25-target groups. The two groups need not be shot in consecutive order.

Muzzle-Loading Shotgun Shooting Option

a. Discuss a brief history of the development of the muzzle-loading shotgun.

b. Identify principal parts of percussion and flintlock shotguns and discuss how they function.

c. Demonstrate and discuss safe handling rules of a muzzle-loading shotgun.

d. Identify the various grades of black powder and their proper use.

e. Discuss proper safety procedures pertaining to black powder use and storage.

f. Discuss proper components of a load.

g. Identify proper procedures and accessories used for loading a muzzle-loading shotgun.

h. Demonstrate knowledge, skill, and attitude necessary to safely shoot a muzzle-loading shotgun on a range, including range procedures.

i. Shoot a moving target with a muzzle-loading shotgun using the five fundamentals of firing the shot.

j. Identify the materials needed to clean a muzzle-loading shotgun properly and safely.

k. Demonstrate how to clean a muzzle-loading shotgun safely.

l. Identify the causes of a muzzle-loading shotgun’s failing to fire and explain or demonstrate proper correction procedures.

m. Discuss what points you would consider if selecting a muzzle-loading shotgun.

n. Shooting score required—Hit at least five out of 15 targets.

Citizenship in the World Merit Badge Requirements

1. Explain what citizenship in the world means to you and what you think it takes to be a good world citizen.

2. Explain how one becomes a citizen in the United States, and explain the rights, duties, and obligations of U.S. citizenship. Discuss the similarities and differences between the rights, duties, and obligations of U.S. citizens and the citizens of two other countries.

3. Do the following: a. Pick a current world event. In relation to this current event, discuss with your counselor how a country’s national interest and its relationship with other countries might affect areas such as its security, its economy, its values, and the health of its citizens., b. Select a foreign country and discuss with your counselor how its geography, natural resources, and climate influence its economy and its global partnerships with other countries.

4. Do TWO of the following: a. Explain international law and how it differs from national law. Explain the role of international law and how international law can be used as a tool for conflict resolution., b. Using resources such as major daily newspapers, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), and news magazines, observe a current issue that involves international trade, foreign exchange, balance of payments, tariffs, and free trade. Explain what you have learned. Include in your discussion an explanation of why countries must cooperate in order for world trade and global competition to thrive., c. Select TWO of the following organizations and describe their role in the world. 1. The United Nations, 2. The World Court, 3. World Organization of the Scout Movement, 4. The World Health Organization, 5. Amnesty International, 6. The International Committee of the Red Cross, 7. CARE.

5. Do the following: a. Discuss the differences between constitutional and nonconstitutional governments., b. Name at least five different types of governments currently in power in the world., c. Show on a world map countries that use each of these five different forms of government.

6. Do the following: a. Explain how a government is represented abroad and how the United States government is accredited to international organizations., b. Describe the roles of the following in the conduct of foreign relations. 1. Ambassador, 2. Consul, 3. Bureau of International Information Programs, 4. Agency for International Development, 5. United States and Foreign Commercial Service, c. Explain the purpose of a passport and visa for international travel.

7. Do TWO of the following (with your parent’s permission) and share with your counselor what you have learned: a. Visit the Web site of the U.S. State Department. Learn more about an issue you find interesting that is discussed on this Web site., b. Visit the Web site of an international news organization or foreign government, OR examine a foreign newspaper available at your local library, bookstore, or newsstand. Find a news story about a human right realized in the United States that is not recognized in another country., c. Visit with a student or Scout from another country and discuss the typical values, holidays, ethnic foods, and traditions practiced or enjoyed there., d. Attend a world Scout jamboree., e. Participate in or attend an international event in your area, such as an ethnic festival, concert, or play.

Orienteering Merit Badge Requirements

1. Show that you know first aid for the types of injuries that could occur while orienteering, including cuts, scratches, blisters, snakebite, insect stings, tick bites, heat and cold reactions (sunburn, heatstroke, heat exhaustion, hypothermia), and dehydration. Explain to your counselor why you should be able to identify poisonous plants and poisonous animals that are found in your area.

2. Explain what orienteering is.

3. Do the following: a. Explain how a compass works. Describe the features of an orienteering compass. b. In the field, show how to take a compass bearing and follow it.

4. Do the following: a. Explain how a topographic map shows terrain features. Point out and name five terrain features on a map and in the field. b. Point out and name 10 symbols on a topographic map. c. Explain the meaning of declination. Tell why you must consider declination when using map and compass together. d. Show a topographic map with magnetic north-south lines. e. Show how to measure distances using an orienteering compass. f. Show how to orient a map using a compass.

5. Set up a 100-meter pace course. Determine your walking and running pace for 100 meters. Tell why it is important to pace-count.

6. Do the following: a. Identify 20 international control description symbols. Tell the meaning of each symbol. b. Show a control description sheet and explain the information provided. c. Explain the following terms and tell when you would use them: attack point, collecting feature, aiming off, contouring, reading ahead, handrail, relocation, rough versus fine orienteering.

7. Do the following: a. Take part in three orienteering events. One of these must be a cross-country course. b. After each event, write a report with 1. a copy of the master map and control description sheet , 2. a copy of the route you took on the course, 3. a discussion of how you could improve your time between control points, and 4. a list of your major weaknesses on this course . Describe what you could do to improve.

8. Do ONE of the following: a. Set up a cross-country course of at least 2,000 meters long with at least five control markers. Prepare the master map and control description sheet. b. Set up a score-orienteering course with 12 control points and a time limit of at least 60 minutes. Prepare the master map and control description sheet.

9. Act as an official during an orienteering even. This may be during the running of the course you set up for requirement 8.

10 Teach orienteering techniques to your patrol, troop or crew.

Citizenship in the World Merit Badge Requirements

  1. Explain what citizenship in the world means to you and what you think it takes to be a good world citizen.
  2. Explain how one becomes a citizen in the United States, and explain the rights, duties, and obligations of U.S. citizenship. Discuss the similarities and differences between the rights, duties, and obligations of U.S. citizens and the citizens of two other countries.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Pick a current world event. In relation to this current event, discuss with your counselor how a country’s national interest and its relationship with other countries might affect areas such as its security, its economy, its values, and the health of its citizens.
    2. Select a foreign country and discuss with your counselor how its geography, natural resources, and climate influence its economy and its global partnerships with other countries.
  4. Do TWO of the following:
    1. Explain international law and how it differs from national law. Explain the role of international law and how international law can be used as a tool for conflict resolution.
    2. Using resources such as major daily newspapers, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), and news magazines, observe a current issue that involves international trade, foreign exchange, balance of payments, tariffs, and free trade. Explain what you have learned. Include in your discussion an explanation of why countries must cooperate in order for world trade and global competition to thrive.
    3. Select TWO of the following organizations and describe their role in the world.
      1. The United Nations
      2. The World Court
      3. World Organization of the Scout Movement
      4. The World Health Organization
      5. Amnesty International
      6. The International Committee of the Red Cross
      7. CARE
  5. Do the following:
    1. Discuss the differences between constitutional and nonconstitutional governments.
    2. Name at least five different types of governments currently in power in the world.
    3. Show on a world map countries that use each of these five different forms of government.
  6. Do the following:
    1. Explain how a government is represented abroad and how the United States government is accredited to international organizations.
    2. Describe the roles of the following in the conduct of foreign relations.
      1. Ambassador
      2. Consul
      3. Bureau of International Information Programs
      4. Agency for International Development
      5. United States and Foreign Commercial Service
    3. Explain the purpose of a passport and visa for international travel.
  7. Do TWO of the following (with your parent’s permission) and share with your counselor what you have learned:
    1. Visit the website of the U.S. State Department. Learn more about an issue you find interesting that is discussed on this website.
    2. Visit the website of an international news organization or foreign government, OR examine a foreign newspaper available at your local library, bookstore, or newsstand. Find a news story about a human right realized in the United States that is not recognized in another country.
    3. Visit with a student or Scout from another country and discuss the typical values, holidays, ethnic foods, and traditions practiced or enjoyed there.
    4. Attend a world Scout jamboree.
    5. Participate in or attend an international event in your area, such as an ethnic festival, concert, or play.

Graphic Design Merit Badge Requirements

  1. Review with your counselor the processes for producing printed communications: offset lithography, screen printing, electronic/digital, relief, and gravure. Collect samples of three products, each one produced using a different printing process, or draw diagrams to help you with your description.
  2. Explain the differences between continuous tone, line, and halftone artwork. Describe how digital images can be created and/or stored in a computer.
  3. Design a printed piece (flier, T-shirt, program, form, etc.) and produce it. Explain your decisions for the typeface or typefaces you use and the way you arrange the elements in your design. Explain which printing process is best suited for printing your design. If desktop publishing is available, identify what hardware and software would be appropriate for outputting your design.
  4. Produce the design you created for requirement 3 using one of the following printing processes:
    1. Offset lithography
      Make a layout, and produce a plate using a process approved by your counselor. Run the plate and print at least 50 copies.
    2. Screen printing
      Make a hand-cut or photographic stencil and attach it to a screen that you have prepared. Mask the screen and print at least 20 copies.
    3. Electronic/digital printing
      Create a layout in electronic form, download it to the press or printer, and run 50 copies. If no electronic interface to the press or printer is available, you may print and scan a paper copy of the layout.
    4. Relief printing
      Prepare a layout or set the necessary type. Make a plate or lock up the form. Use this to print 50 copies.
  5. Review the following postpress operations with your counselor:
    1. Discuss the finishing operations of padding, drilling, cutting, and trimming.
    2. Collect, describe, or identify examples of the following types of binding: perfect, spiral, plastic comb, saddle-stitched, and case.
  6. Do ONE of the following, and then describe the highlights of your visit:
    1. Visit a newspaper printing plant: Follow a story from the editor to the press.
    2. Visit a retail, commercial, or in-plant printing facility. Follow a project from beginning to end.
    3. Visit a school’s graphic arts program. Find out what courses are available and what the prerequisites are.
    4. Visit three websites (with your parent’s permission) that belong to graphic arts professional organizations and/or printing-related companies (suppliers, manufacturers, printers). With permission from your parent or counselor, print out or download product or service information from two of the sites.
  7. Find out about three career opportunities in graphic arts. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.