Troop 505 Order of the Arrow Elections Apr 13

The Campfire StoryDuring our next meeting on April 13th starting at exactly 7pm we will hold our Troop Order of the Arrow Elections. If you qualify and if you are interested in representing the Troop as a brother in the Order of the Arrow, please plan on attending this meeting.

For more than 95 years, the Order of the Arrow (OA) has recognized Scouts and Scouters who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives. This recognition provides encouragement for others to live these ideals as well. Arrowmen are known for maintaining camping traditions and spirit, promoting year-round and long-term resident camping, developing leaders, and providing cheerful service to others. OA service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults are models of quality leadership development and programming that enrich, support, and help to extend Scouting to America’s youth.

Mission

The mission of the Order of the Arrow is to fulfill its purpose as an integral part of the Boy Scouts of America through positive youth leadership under the guidance of selected capable adults.

Purpose

As Scouting’s National Honor Society, our purpose is to:

Recognize those who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives and through that recognition cause others to conduct themselves in a way that warrants similar recognition.
Promote camping, responsible outdoor adventure, and environmental stewardship as essential components of every Scout’s experience, in the unit, year-round, and in summer camp.
Develop leaders with the willingness, character, spirit and ability to advance the activities of their units, our Brotherhood, Scouting, and ultimately our nation.
Crystallize the Scout habit of helpfulness into a life purpose of leadership in cheerful service to others.
History

The Order of the Arrow was founded by Dr. E. Urner Goodman and Carroll A. Edson in 1915 at the Treasure Island Camp of the Philadelphia Council, Boy Scouts of America. It became an official program experiment in 1922 and was approved as part of the Scouting program in 1934. In 1948 the OA, recognized as the BSA’s national brotherhood of honor campers, became an official part of the Boy Scouts of America. In 1998, the Order of the Arrow became recognized as Scouting’s National Honor Society when it expanded its reach beyond camping to include a greater focus on leadership development, membership extension, adventurous programming, and broader service to Scouting and the community. Today, its service, activities, adventures, and training for youth and adults, are models of quality leadership development and programming that enrich, support, and help extend Scouting to America’s youth.

Membership

The OA has over 171,000 members in lodges affiliated with more than 290 local BSA councils.

Eligibility

The Order of the Arrow membership requirements are:

Unit leader approval. To become eligible for election, a Boy Scout or Varsity Scout must be registered with the Boy Scouts of America and have the approval of his unit leader prior to the election. The unit leader must certify his Scout spirit (i.e., his adherence to the Scout Oath and Law and active participation in unit activities). The unit leader must also certify that the nominee meets all specified requirements at the time of this annual election.

Youth membership qualifications. All members of, or candidates for membership in, the Order of the Arrow who are under 21 years of age shall be considered youth members or candidates for youth membership, subject to meeting the following requirements:

Be a registered member of the Boy Scouts of America.
Hold the First Class rank of the Boy Scouts of America, as a minimum.
After registration with a troop or team, have experienced 15 days and nights of Boy Scout camping during the two-year period prior to the election. The 15 days and nights must include one, but no more than one, long-term camp consisting of six consecutive days and five nights of resident camping, approved and under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America. The balance of the camping must be overnight, weekend, or other short-term camps.
Candidates for youth membership shall be elected by other youth members in accordance with policies set forth by the national Order of the Arrow committee.

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Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Jan 6

Growth of a LeaderTroop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on January 6th from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on January 6th from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

 

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

 

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Sep 2

Growth of a LeaderTroop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on September 2nd from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on September 2nd from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Aug 5

Spirit of America
Troop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on August 5th from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on August 5th from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Jul 8

We Too Have a Job to doTroop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on July 8th from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on July 8th from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Jun 3

I Will Do My BestTroop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on June 3rd from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on June 3rd from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Elections May 27

I Will Do My BestTroop 505 will hold its annual Troop Elections Meeting at at the American Legion Post 6 Chapel Hill on May 27th from 7-7:30pm. During this meeting will will update all Patrol rosters, we will elect our new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, our new Patrol Leaders and new Assistant Patrol Leaders. Following Patrol Leader elections our new Senior Partol Leader will appoint Troop Leadership Positions.

If you are interested in any Troop 505 leadership positions please come to this Troop meeting with a 5 minute speech prepared describing why you feel you would be best suited for your desired office.

Patrol Meetings will follow our scheduled Troop Elections from 7:30-8:00pm.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council May 6

A Scout is Loyal-1Troop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on May 6thth from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on May 6th from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Jan 7

A Scout is Loyal-1Troop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on January 7th from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on January 7th from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

Troop 505 Patrol Leaders Council Dec 10

A Scout is Loyal-1Troop 505 will have it’s regularly scheduled Patrol Leader’s Council on December 10th from 6:30-7pm. The PLC is always scheduled the first Troop Meeting of every month. If you currently hold a leadership role that requires participation in the Troop PLC, you attendance is expected. These positions include: Senior Patrol Leader, Assistant Senior Patrol Leader, Patrol Leaders, Assistant Patrol Leaders (if your Patrol Leader is unable to attend), Scribe, all Troop Guides and all Junior Assistant Scoutmasters.

In an effort to better organize our Uniformed Adult Leadership, a meeting of Assistant Scoutmaster’s is requested on December 10th from 6:30-7pm during the regularly scheduled PLC. If you are currently a registered Assistant Scoutmaster with Troop 505 or if you desire volunteering in this role, your attendance is requested.

“The patrol system is not one method in which Scouting for boys can be carried on. It is the only method.”

—Lord Baden-Powell, Scouting’s founder

The Patrol Leaders’ Council

A Troop should always be led by its elected boy leaders. With the guidance of the Scoutmaster and his assistants, the boy leaders plan the program, conduct troop meetings, and provide leadership among their peers. The Patrol Leaders’ Council (PLC), not the adult leaders, is responsible for planning and conducting the Troop’s meetings and activities.

The members of the Troop elect one of their own to serve as the Senior Patrol Leader. To give more Scouts the opportunity to lead, once a year, the current Troop 505 Assistant Senior Patrol Leader moves into the Senior Patrol Leader position and the Troop elects a new Assistant Senior Patrol Leader.

Your Role in the Patrol Leaders’ Council

The Patrol Leaders’ Council is made up of the Senior Patrol Leader, who presides over the meetings; the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader and all Patrol Leaders, with the support of the Troop Scribe and the Troop Guides. As a Patrol Leader, you serve as the voice of your Patrol. During PLC Patrol Leaders should present the ideas and concerns of your patrol and in turn share the decisions of the Patrol Leaders’ Council with your Patrol.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Meetings

The Troop’s meeting programs and activities are selected and planned at the annual program planning conference. The troop’s yearly plan is then submitted to the Troop Committee for approval. The Troop Committee either approves the plan or makes alternative suggestions for the Patrol Leaders’ Council to consider. At its monthly meetings, the PLC fine-tunes the plans for the upcoming month by organizing and assigning responsibilities for the weekly Troop meeting program and planning the details of any upcoming Troop activities. The Troop Committee should always interact with the PLC through the Scoutmaster.

Patrol Leaders’ Council Position Descriptions

Senior Patrol Leader (SPL) – top junior leader in the troop. He is elected by the entire troop and leads the Patrol Leaders’ Council and, in consultation with the Scoutmaster, appoints other junior leaders and assigns specific responsibilities as needed.

Assistant Senior Patrol Leader (ASPL) – fills in for Senior Patrol Leader in his absence. There may be more than one ASLP. They are responsible for training and giving direction to the Scribe, Quartermaster, Troop Historian, Librarian, Webmaster and Instructors.

Patrol Leader (PL) – gives leadership to members of his Patrol and represents them on the PLC.

Assistant Patrol Leader (APL) – is fully informed about all aspects concerning his Patrol and fills in for the Patrol Leader in his absence.

Troop Scribe (TS) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as the Troop Secretary.

Troop Guide (TG) – attends the meeting to support the PLC as an advisor and guide to the Patrol(s) and Patrol Leader(s).

Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM) – an Eagle Scout, 16 years or older, attends the meeting to support the PLC, who supervises and supports other boy leaders as assigned by the Scoutmaster.